Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Pretty Tricky?


When Senator Newman introduced SB 465, the summary of the bill said it would increase the number of years, from four to five, that a school must fail to meet the requirements to be rated fully accredited before the supervision of such school is transferred to the Opportunity Educational Institution (state take-over).
This did not grab VEA’s attention, as it actually would have reduced the number of schools subject to state take-over.

However, when you read the introduced bill, it said “Supervision of any school that has been denied accreditation for the previous two school years shall be transferred to the Opportunity Educational Institution.”

The language now in code says, “three school years.”  That's current law.
 
So, the summary does not appear to match the bill.  What's with that?

On Monday the Senate Committee on Education and Health amended the bill to make it “any school that has been denied accreditation.”  That makes it so that schools would be taken over after failing to gain accreditation for just one year, rather than three.  That would speed the process and increase the number of schools to be taken over.  The amended bill reported on a straightparty-line vote.  This was on the last day that the Republicans controlled the committee.

Today when the bill came up for a final vote in the Senate, Senator Newman asked that the bill go by for the day, and made vague mention to a need for some changes to the bill.

I urge you to call or email your Senator urging them to resist any amendments to SB 465 which will increase the number of schools subject to state take-over, to vote against SB 465, and to support efforts to “zero out” funds for OEI in the Senate budget.

 Click here for Senate contact information.

 

 

No comments: